At least once a day, three days a week, take Celery seed tea prepared by pouring a pint of boiling water over a tablespoonful of Celery seeds (freshly ground or cut) and allowing it to steep. Let it cool, then strain and drink. If practical, the tea should be made fresh for each use.

It is very potent in case of Kidney Stones, and chronic kidney diseases.

Avoid in pregnancy because it is a uterine stimulant!

Celery seeds have a direct action on the kidneys, increasing the elimination of water and speeding up the clearance of accumulated toxins from the joints and so is of benefit in any oedematous condition that accompanies arthritis. It is often administered with Taraxacum radix (Dandalion) to increase the efficiency of elimination by both the kidneys and the liver. Apium is also hypoglycaemic, and as such is helpful in diabetes; this action seems to involve a direct action on the pancreas and its production of insulin. Clinical studies in China have demonstrated a hypotensive action for the tincture, and this is accompanied by increased urine output. The flavonoid apigenin has exhibited significant anti-platelet activity in vitro.

Other common names: Garden Celery, Smallage, Wild Celery

Celery seeds are very helpful for people suffering from an over supply of uric acid. Celery has large amounts of potassium and organic sodium that help to rid the body of waste material by stimulating various sites such as the skin, bowels and kidneys. It re-balances the acid/alkaline in the system and may help prevent certain cancers.

Therapeutics and Pharmacology: Apium is known as a mild diuretic and urinary antiseptic and has been used in the treatment of urinary stones – calculi. It has a calming effect on the gut, and can be used in the relief of flatulence and griping pains. However, whilst it can reduce visceral spasm, it conversely stimulates the smooth muscle of the womb and can bring on delayed menstruation. After childbirth it helps the uterus readjust and encourages the flow of breast milk. The phthalides are the constituents responsible for the antispasmodic, sedative and diuretic actions. Apium has a direct action on the kidneys, increasing the elimination of water and speeding up the clearance of accumulated toxins from the joints and so is of benefit in any oedematous condition that accompanies arthritis. It is often administered with Taraxacum radix (Dandalion) to increase the efficiency of elimination by both the kidneys and the liver. Apium is also hypoglycaemic, and as such is helpful in diabetes; this action seems to involve a direct action on the pancreas and its production of insulin. Clinical studies in China have demonstrated a hypotensive action for the tincture, and this is accompanied by increased urine output. The flavonoid apigenin has exhibited significant anti-platelet activity in vitro.

The volatile oil in Apium has been shown to have antifungal activity, and it is active against many bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus albus, Shigella dysenteriae, Salmonella typhi, Streptococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes and Pseudomonas solanacearum. No activity was observed against Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Combinations: Apium combines well with Menyanthes and/or Guaiacum in rheumatic disease. The therapeutic action of Apium is potentiated by Taraxacum.

Caution: Apium should be avoided in pregnancy because it is a uterine stimulant. The volatile oil in quantity is toxic to the kidneys and so should not be used in kidney disorders. Allergic reactions are rare.

Preparation and Dosage: (thrice daily)

GSL Schedule 1

* Dried fruits: 0.5-3g or by 1:5 decoction
* Tincture: 1:5 in 90% alcohol, 2-8ml
* Liquid Extract: 1:1 in 90% alcohol, 0.5-2ml

Additional Comments: In Germany, celery preparations are used to treat loss of appetite loss and exhaustion, and also in the prophylaxis of nervous exhaustion.

Bibliography

* Bartram, T. 1995 Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine, 1st edn.,Grace Publishers, Bournemouth.
* Bradley, P.R. (ed.) 1992 British Herbal Compendium, Volume 1, BHMA, Bournemouth.
* Bremness, L. 1994 Herbs, Dorling Kindersley Eyewitness Handbook, London.
* BHMA 1983 British Herbal Pharmacopoeia, BHMA, Bournemouth.
* Chevallier, A. 1996 The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants, Dorling Kindersley, London.
* Hoffmann, D. 1990 The New Holistic Herbal, Second Edition, Element, Shaftesbury.
* Hyperhealth 1996 Natural Health and Nutrition Databank, v.96.1 CD-ROM, ©In-Tele-Health, available from Healthworks, Leeds. ISBN 0-646-30942-0
* Lust, J. 1990 The Herb Book, Bantam, London.
* Newall, C.A., Anderson, L.A., & Phillipson, J.D. 1996 Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health-care Professionals, The Pharmaceutical Press, London.
* Ody, P. 1993 The Herb Society’s Complete Medicinal Herbal, Dorling Kindersley, London.
* Press, B. & Gibbons, B. 1993 Wild Flowers of Britain and Europe: Photographic Field Guide, New Holland Publishers, London.
* Wren, R.C. 1988 Potter’s New Cyclopaedia of Botanical Drugs and Preparations, C.W.Daniel, Saffron Walden.

Herb facts: Celery is a biennial plant indigenous to southern Europe, Asia, and Africa. It is also found in North and South America. Celery grows in damp places and resembles domestic celery, except that it has a less agreeable taste and is smaller in size. In its second year the plant produces an angular furrowed stem reaching three feet in height. It bears dark green leaves that are opposite, shiny, and primate, having wedge-shaped, incised, toothed leaflets. From July to November, white to gray-white flowers appear in paniculate compound umbels. The fruits are dark brown, elliptic-ovate seeds. The medicinal parts are the roots, leaves and seeds.

CHEMICAL COMPOSITION

* Antioxidant properties; Butyl phthalide; Fatty acids
* Flavonoids; Limonene; Oleic acid
* Palmitic acid; Phthalides; Petroselenic acid

Santalol

* For definition of some of the above terms see the dictionary section of this book.

NUTRIENT COMPOSITION

Bioflavonoids; Calcium; Iron
Magnesium; Phosphorus; Potassium
Sodium; UFA; Vitamin A
Vitamin C; Zinc

PROPERTIES AND USES

* Antispasmodic – relieves or prevents spasms, usually of the smooth muscles; barbiturates and valerian are examples of antispasmodics.
* Appetizer – a substance which stimulates the appetite
* Aromatic – an agent with an agreeable odor and other stimulating qualities.
* Carminative – an agent which assists in the expelling gas from the intestines.
* Diuretic – Diuretics form a class of drugs which increase the volume of urine produced by the kidneys. It can be used effectively to treat mild cases of edema when kidney function is good and when the underlying abnormality of cardiac function, capillary pressure, or salt retention is being corrected simultaneously. Diuretics are not an appropriate treatment for edema caused by inflammation of the kidneys, and are useless in cardiac edema associated with advanced kidney insufficiency. There are a variety of diuretics with different modes of action. Among the diuretics are spironolactones, triamterene, and theobromine.
* Emmenagogue – an agent which stimulates menstrual flow.
* Sedative – Sedatives are a class of drugs which function to quiet nervous excitement and reduce motor activity without inducing sleep. They are used in the management of neuroses and in the treatment of anxiety and apprehension accompanying various disease states such as hypertension. Sedatives commonly function to induce reversible depression of the central nervous system. Examples of this class are Phenobarbital, secobarbital sodium, and pentobarbital.
* Stimulant – an agent that temporarily increases the activity or physiological processes. Stimulants may be classified according to the organ upon which they act; for example, an intestinal stimulant is that which stimulates the intestines.
* Tonic – an agent which strengthens or tones.
* Celery produces perspiration and is useful for nervousness. It should be cooked with milk and eaten freely to neutralize uric acid and other excess acids in the body, thus aiding in the treatment of rheumatism. Celery is useful for headaches when taken as a tea. The seeds and stems have been used in Australia as an acid neutralizer.
* Celery seed is used almost exclusively as a diuretic. Since it is very powerful, it is often used alone in severe cases of gout, edema, and dropsy. At other times, small amounts are added to diuretic herbal blends to provide reliable action. The herb is also used to treat kidney and bladder disorders, but is avoided if the kidneys are inflamed.
* Celery seed is sometimes used as a carminative and antispasmodic in the digestive system. This action depends on the presence of its volatile oil. Celery has been used on occasion for rheumatism and arthritis, although it its efficacy against those ailments has not been established. Celery plant, not the seed, is purported to be emmenagogic.

TOXICITY FACTORS

Celery’s volatile oils in large amounts can sedate the central nervous system; some think this makes the oils more toxic than therapeutic.

DRUG PRECAUTIONS AND INTERACTIONS

Known Interactions – None

Possible Interactions – The antiarrhythmic agent, quinidine, may increase the hypoprothrombinemic effect of celery. Vitamin K, menadione and menadiol sodium diphosphate may antagonize the anticoagulant effects of coumarins, such as celery.